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Today's one-day strike by fast-food workers around the globe aims to build pressure for better wages and workplace rights.

INSTITUTE INDEX: Striking for fast-food justice

Date on which fast-food workers across the United States and around the world are taking part in a one-day strike for higher pay and the right to unionize: 5/15/2014

Number of continents where fast-food workers are taking part in the strike: 6

Number of U.S. cities where fast-food workers will be striking: 150

Hourly wage the striking U.S. fast-food workers are demanding: $15

Average hourly wage currently earned by U.S. fast-food workers: $9

Yearly salary that amounts to: about $19,000

Official poverty line for a family of three: $19,790

Current U.S. minimum wage: $7.25

Level to which President Obama has called for raising the minimum wage: $10.10

Date on which an appointed mayoral committee in Seattle recommended establishing a $15 minimum wage in the city: 5/1/2014

Hourly wage earned by Louise Marie Rantzau, a McDonald's worker in Denmark who says she's committed to supporting other fast-food workers' rights: $21

Profit McDonald's earned last year alone: $5.6 billion

Total annual compensation for McDonald's top seven corporate executives: $67.6 million

Amount McDonald's has contributed to federal politicians since 1989 as part of its efforts to keep wages low and workers unorganized: $5.8 million

Estimated amount that public assistance for fast-food workers costs taxpayers each year: at least $3.8 billion

For McDonald's workers alone: $1.2 billion

Percent of McDonald's workers who say they have been the victims of wage theft: 84

Date on which McDonald's hosts its annual shareholders meeting in Oak Brook, Illinois, where workers' wages are expected to be a central issue: 5/22/2014

(Click on figure to go to source.)

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Today's one-day strike by fast-food workers around the globe aims to build pressure for better wages and workplace rights.
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