Acts of God? (2004)

How natural are natural disasters?

Vol. 32, Nos. 1-4 Winter 2004

"Four years of unprecedented rainfall left much of West Virginia devastated. Now residents, activists, and regulators struggle to reform the logging and mining industries that bear much of the responsibility." From Deluge without End by Penny Loeb

COVER SECTION

  • Letter from the Publisher: Acts of God? by Chris Kromm
  • Fear and Flooding in North Carolina by Sue Sturgis
    • A hurricane-harried African-American town lives with the specter of future disaster.
  • Portraits of Disaster by Hart Matthews PRINT ONLY
    • Scenes from the hurricane-ravaged coast of North Carolina. 
  • Deluge without End by Penny Loeb PRINT ONLY
    • Four years of unprecedented rainfall left much of West Virginia devastated. Now residents, activists, and regulators struggle to reform the logging and mining industries that bear much of the responsibility.
  • Last Call for Judgment Day by Ted Steinberg PRINT ONLY
    • An earthquake in South Carolina? It happened in 1886, destroying much of Charleston and shaking faith in the economic promise of the New South.

SPECIAL INVESTIGATION:

  • Tort Reform, Lone Star Style by Stephanie Mencimer
    • How Governor Bush and the business lobby drastically curtailed the rights of Texans to their day in court, and how President Bush would like to extend these "reforms" to the rest of the country. 


ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

  • Abu Ghraib in Virginia by Laura LaFay
    • The abuse of Iraqi inmates follows a pattern established in Southern prisons.
  • Extreme Makeover? by Sue Sturgis
    • How Southern progressives propose to remake the Democratic Party.
  • The Price of War Games by Rania Masri
    • Two Mississippians try to make the U.S. military pay for its damage to a Puerto Rican island.  

 

*This edition can be made available as a PDF.

 

 

Volume and Number: 
Vol. 32, Nos. 1-4 Winter 2004

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